Each regulators requirements for reflection

General Chiropractic Council

We encourage registrants to be reflective practitioners through the continuing professional development (CPD) scheme. The GCC is not prescriptive with the type of activity that registrants must complete for their CPD, however, chiropractors must design learning cycles that require them to reflect on their practice in order to assess their learning needs and subsequently reflect on and evaluate the effectiveness of the CPD activities. The CPD scheme is also designed to promote learning with others.

General Dental Council

We introduce reflection through the enhanced CPD scheme, and encourage dental professionals to reflect on the outcomes of their CPD activity, focussing on what they have learned and how this influences their daily practice and duties. The GDC is not prescriptive with how professionals should reflect or record reflection - professionals should reflect in the way that suits them best.

Communitybaptistpa

Group reflection activities should be encouraged by employers and training providers as they provide mechanisms to identify complex issues and effect change across systems.

Time should be made available, both for self-reflection, and to reflect in groups.

General Optical Council

Reflection is currently part of the General Optical Council's enhanced continuing education and training (CET) scheme and there are a number of tools registrants can use to reflect on their practice.

  • At the beginning of each CET cycle, registrants are asked to complete a scope of practice questionnaire to help identify learning and development.
  • Registrants are expected to complete a personal development plan for each three year CET cycle, which they should use to reflect on their practice, plan their CET and review how well it went.
  • Registrants must complete a reflective statement when they attend a peer review event or a peer discussion to capture their learning.
  • Registrants can voluntarily reflect on their practice at any point and add a reflective statement on the CET system.
  • We are currently reviewing our CET scheme with the aim of further embedding and instilling the concept of reflection.

General Osteopathic Council

Reflection is an intrinsic element of the CPD requirement for osteopaths. They are required to record CPD activities and the relevance and impact of these on practice.

Many osteopaths work in sole practice. The CPD scheme encourages engagement with other professionals treating patients. For example, osteopaths can seek objective feedback on practice through the input of another osteopath or healthcare professional. The three-year CPD cycle culminates in a peer discussion review, which is a structured conversation with another osteopath or registered healthcare professional in which the osteopath demonstrates how they have engaged with CPD the scheme.

General Pharmaceutical Council

Reflection is a core part of our model. We encourage pharmacy professionals to reflect with others through their peer discussion. Registrants choose their peers and may choose to reflect as part of a group, including a multi-disciplinary group.

Health and Care Professions Council

We take a flexible, outcome based approach to CPD and therefore do not specify the types of activities registrants must include in their CPD profiles. However, our CPD guidance encourages registrants to learn and reflect on their practice. In particular, we reference ‘developing evidence that suggests that the most effective learning activities are often those that are interactive and which encourage self-reflection’.

Nursing and Midwifery Council

We encourage nurses, nursing associates and midwives to engage in reflective practice and encourage a culture of sharing, reflection and improvement; ensuring nurses, nursing associates and midwives do not practise in professional isolation.

Pharmaceutical Society NI

We encourage pharmacists to reflect on their practice and require them to record this as part of their mandatory annual CPD submission. This is further articulated in Principle 5 of our Code.